What do you do when you want to cheer yourself up? I drink high mountain oolong because I love how they make me feel warm. I really enjoy taking time to dedicate myself only to tea and steep the same leaves until they transfer all of their peacefulness onto me. 5 degrees outside doesn’t really make me happy (or warm). So, I decided it’s time to review Ali Bear high mountain oolong from Teabento.

Besides, I took the photos last week when I was back home with family. So, Ali Bear looks like a perfect choice for today. (Cold weather, please go away).

High Mountain Oolong Ali Bear

High mountain oolong Ali Bear

Ali Bear comes from Taiwan (Alishan, app. 1500 meters), from Jin Xuan cultivar. If you are new to Taiwanese teas, jin xuan is used for making “milky” teas, a type of high mountain oolong that has natural creaminess. They are the original “milky” teas, without any artificial flavors. Even though some of artificially flavored milky teas can taste good, they are very very far from the original. So, if you are very new to “milky” teas, you might not even notice that you are actually drinking jin xuan tea.

High Mountain Oolong Ali Bear

Leaves are intensive darkish green, matte. This tea has a quite nice scent in a heated teapot – warm bread with almonds and green soul. It almost feels as scents are layered.

I decided to follow Teabento’s guidelines for brewing and this is how Bear liked his tea bath. Color is very pretty, clean, bright yellow. Leaves have a bit of flowery spiciness mixed with fresh and warming scent. First infusion is quite light. I like the second and third the most, when Ali Bear gets much more balanced and creamy. It gives a smooth full mouth-feel, quite warming and soothing. This tea can give at least seven good infusions.

High Mountain Oolong Ali Bear

Link to Ali Bear tea.

Disclaimer: This is not a referral link.

 

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